Murano Glass Studio Venice, Italy November 2016

 

Back to Murano

In November Shane Guffogg went back out to the Murano Glass studio of Fabiano in Venice Italy. His collaborations with the Alvise Schiavon and the Murano Glass studio, began in 2004 with a glass sculpture that Shane did while in Venice to participate in the Venice Biennale.  That first sculpture laid the foundation for a strong collaborative relationship between Guffogg, Fabiano and the Murano Glass studios. They have worked on many projects together over the years but this sculpture demanded the most forward thinking technology blended with the ancient knowledge held in the hearts and hands of the Murano glass masters.

 

Working with glass demands patience and timing. It takes years of experience to become a glass master. The final steps needed to make this 40 inch tall glass sculpture required 8 people, and a fork lift all working together as a team. In the space of just 15 minutes the molten ball of glass was pushed, pulled, blown and stretched into, "RITORNO DAL DOMANI", the remarkable glass sculpture Shane Guffogg envisioned 6 months ago.

 

 

 

 

Some of Shane's glass pieces start as a drawing but for this one he used clay to fully develop the piece he had been imagining. His clay sculpture was carved in Carrara marble (a collaboration with Hunt Studios in San Fransisco, California). Then the finished marble sculpture entitled, Return to Tomorrow, was used to develop a multi piece mold by the Murano Glass studio of Fabiano in Venice Italy. The complicated mold made of large timbers was soaked in water and lashed together with cables allowing the glass masters to capture and tame the red hot molten glass. It took weeks to refine all the steps involved and by the time Shane arrived in Venice most of the groundwork was in place and ready for him to guide the glass sculpture to completion.

The color and finish of the glass will ultimately drive the feel and luminosity of the finished piece. Shane shared his thoughts on the amethyst color saying,. "I chose to use the color amethyst, maybe because it is a color that Giotto used in his painting, of his father's robe, maybe because it is beautiful and refined. It hovers between heaven and earth, with the faint purple-gray color capturing both. The shapes within my sculpture, "Return to Tomorrow", are informed by the movement of my hands in clay, which is how it all began.”

Check out this amazing video captured by one of the witnesses to the birth of, "RITORNO DAL DOMANI".

Using air to blow dust out of the mold

Using air to blow dust out of the mold

Timbers of the mold being locked together.

Timbers of the mold being locked together.

image1 copy.jpg
Two of the glass sculptures being worked on at the foundry

Two of the glass sculptures being worked on at the foundry